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COVID-19 deaths rising despite 780m vaccine doses administered -WHO

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he Director-General of the World Health Organisation, Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, has raised concerns over increasing cases of deaths and confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the globe.

He noted that the increasing figures were being recorded despite that 780 million doses of vaccine been administered globally.

Ghebreyesus spoke at a media briefing on COVID-19 on Monday.

He noted that the increasing figures were being recorded after the world recorded declining cases in January and February.

While describing vaccines as a vital and powerful tool, he said they were not the only tool to curtail the further spread of the virus.

The WHO DG said, “In January and February, the world saw six consecutive weeks of declining cases.

“We have now seen seven consecutive weeks of increasing cases, and four weeks of increasing deaths.

“Last week was the fourth-highest number of cases in a single week so far.

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“Several countries in Asia and the Middle East have seen large increases in cases.

“This is despite the fact that more than 780 million doses of vaccine have now been administered globally.

“Make no mistake, vaccines are a vital and powerful tool. But they are not the only tool. We say this day after day, week after week. And we will keep saying it.

“Physical distancing works. Masks work. Hand hygiene works. Ventilation works. Surveillance, testing, contact tracing, isolation, supportive quarantine, and compassionate care – they all work to stop infections and save lives.”

Ghebreyesus noted that confusion, complacency, and inconsistency in public health measures and their application are driving transmission and costing lives.

He said it would take a consistent, coordinated, and comprehensive approach to stem the tide.

He added, “So many countries around the world have shown that this virus can be stopped and contained with proven public health measures and strong systems that respond rapidly and consistently.

“As a result, many of those countries have gained control over COVID-19, and their people are now able to enjoy sporting events, concerts, restaurants, and seeing their family and friends safely.

“WHO does not want endless lockdowns. The countries that have done best have taken a tailored, measured, agile and evidence-based combination of measures.

“We too want to see societies and economies reopening, and travel and trade resuming.

“But right now, intensive care units in many countries are overflowing and people are dying – and it is totally avoidable.

“In some countries, despite continuing transmission, restaurants and nightclubs are full, markets are open and crowded with few people taking precautions.

“Some people appear to be taking the approach that if they are relatively young, it doesn’t matter if they get COVID-19.”

While regretting that young and healthy people have died, the WHO DG said the world still doesn’t fully understand the long-term consequences of infection for those who survive.

See the full speech, titled, Director-General’s opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19:

Good morning, good afternoon and good evening.

In January and February, the world saw six consecutive weeks of declining cases.

We have now seen seven consecutive weeks of increasing cases, and four weeks of increasing deaths.

Last week was the fourth-highest number of cases in a single week so far.

Several countries in Asia and the Middle East have seen large increases in cases.

This is despite the fact that more than 780 million doses of vaccine have now been administered globally.

Make no mistake, vaccines are a vital and powerful tool. But they are not the only tool.

We say this day after day, week after week. And we will keep saying it.

Physical distancing works. Masks work. Hand hygiene works. Ventilation works. Surveillance, testing, contact tracing, isolation, supportive quarantine and compassionate care – they all work to stop infections and save lives.

But confusion, complacency and inconsistency in public health measures and their application are driving transmission and costing lives.

It takes a consistent, coordinated and comprehensive approach.

So many countries around the world have shown that this virus can be stopped and contained with proven public health measures and strong systems that respond rapidly and consistently.

As a result, many of those countries have gained control over COVID-19, and their people are now able to enjoy sporting events, concerts, restaurants and seeing their family and friends safely.

WHO does not want endless lockdowns. The countries that have done best have taken a tailored, measured, agile and evidence-based combination of measures.

We too want to see societies and economies reopening, and travel and trade resuming.

But right now, intensive care units in many countries are overflowing and people are dying – and it is totally avoidable.

In some countries, despite continuing transmission, restaurants and night clubs are full, markets are open and crowded with few people taking precautions.

Some people appear to be taking the approach that if they are relatively young, it doesn’t matter if they get COVID-19.

This disease is not flu. Young, healthy people have died. And we still don’t fully understand the long-term consequences of infection for those who survive.

Many people who have suffered even mild disease report long-term symptoms including fatigue, weakness, “brain fog”, dizziness, tremors, insomnia, depression, anxiety, joint pain, chest tightness and more, which are symptoms of long-COVID.

This pandemic is a long way from over. But we have many reasons for optimism.

The decline in cases and deaths during the first two months of the year shows that this virus and its variants can be stopped.

With a concerted effort to apply public health measures alongside equitable vaccination, we could bring this pandemic under control in a matter of months.

Whether we do or not comes down to the decisions and the actions that governments and individuals make every day.

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Coronavirus

COVID-19: FG places USA, Canada, South Africa, 11 others on watch list

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he Federal government has placed 14 countries on watch list as part of measures to prevent a possible spread of the new COVID-19 variant.

The Lagos State Commissioner for Health, Prof. Akin Abayomi, who made this known via his Twitter account on Wednesday, said the measure became necessary following the discovery of variants from banned countries within the country.

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“The affected countries are Canada, USA, France, Germany, Netherlands, Togo, Ghana, Cameroon, Angola, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda.

“Nigerians returning from lesser hajj would have to undergo a compulsory seven-day self-isolation.

“The state will not hesitate to prosecute anyone, irrespective of status, who fails to comply with the directive.

“The state has, however, developed a five-pillar strategy for curbing a potential third wave in Lagos.

“These include ensuring that all travelers carry out COVID-19 tests while we also introduce PCR tests to determine variants and mandatory seven-day quarantine,” he said.

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Rivers government recalls civil servants to work after COVID-19 shutdown

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he Rivers State Government has directed civil servants from grade level 1 to 13 who have been at home since January due to the second wave of COVID-19 to resume work from Thursday, April 29, 2021.

The directive was contained in a circular issued on Wednesday, April 28, by the Rivers State Head of Service, Rufus Godwin.

The circular directed all affected civil servants to strictly comply with all COVID-19 protocols by observing social distance and wearing face masks.

 

 

The Head of Service also directed all Permanent Secretaries and Heads of Extra Ministerial Offices to monitor and ensure compliance with the directive.

Rivers State Governor, Nyesom Wike had on January 20, 2021 ordered public workers from grade level 1 to 13 to work from home except those on essential duties.

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Coronavirus

COVID-19: I won’t take vaccine, I’m not guinea pig – Bishop Oyedepo

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ishop David Oyedepo of the Living Faith Church, has said he won’t to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

Oyedepo, who spoke during the church’s Covenant Hour of Prayer programme, said he is not a guinea pig, hence would not take the vaccine.

Stressing that the world was confused over COVID-19, the clergyman insisted that the church has the answer.

According to Oyedepo: “I have never seen a generation where you force people to take vaccines. It is inhuman; it is immoral sir. I’m not a lawyer but I don’t think it is legal. You can’t come to my house and want to give me injections.

“On what? Did I invite you? They are confused. But the church has the answer. Did you see any outbreak of virus here? How will it enter the gate? Will it come through the air? How?

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“One woman just got down after that injection in Kaduna. What kind of life? Are human beings now turned to guinea pigs? The world is confused but the church is triumphing.

“So, the triumph of the church will humble the pride of the world. They don’t know what to do, sir. In the last days, the church will be reigning in power and glory. That is God’s agenda.

“No apologies. There is a big, big bird in our land, saying, ‘don’t take it, they are deceivers’. Let me see someone who will come and inject me.

“Are you going to tie my hands? How? Did I invite you? I know you are quiet, you will hear more of it. My job is to expose the devil and tell his agents, ‘get off, we are not guinea pigs.”

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